Caring Transitions' April 2017 Newsletter

It’s Your Move: Advice from the Senior Move Experts

For over a decade, Caring Transitions has remained the nation’s largest branded network of professional move managers. We take great pride in understanding what it really takes to help older adults navigate late life transitions such as moving to a senior living community or downsizing to a smaller home for safety or convenience.  

Recently, we asked some of our clients to share common challenges or obstacles they face when deciding to move in later life. Here are some of their responses.

 

“I love my home and neighborhood and am not sure I’m ready to leave what is familiar to me.”

Statistically, only about 1% of older adults move out of state each year and the most popular destinations continue to be warmer states such as Florida, Arizona, South Carolina, Texas and North Carolina. Most seniors do prefer to stay close to home where they have long-standing connections to their communities, even when those communities have changed significantly.

Caring Transitions takes time to get to know our clients during our free in-home visit and we often discover that while the neighborhood may feel “comfortable” to the client, it no longer serves the client’s best interests.  This can be influenced by the client’s own medical requirements, due to an unsafe home environment, lack of transportation, lack of familial or social support or other reasons. Time and again, we meet clients who have remained close to their favorite club, church or synagogue, only to realize they no longer attend due to compromised health or mobility.

To help facilitate a feeling of “home” no matter where the client is moving, Caring Transitions® helps every client decide what they may wish to bring to a new home. We focus on possessions that are useful, but also most loved, comforting and familiar to the client.

 

 “I am not sure if I should sell my house now. The market may get better next year.”

None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to real estate, but Caring Transitions® does have a great many professional partners in real estate who can help our clients understand the market. We often work as a team with realtors, financial advisors and guardians to help the client make the best decision for their individual situation.  This may mean moving forward now or holding off for a few more months or even years.

Either way, moving in late life works best with plenty of thought, planning and preparation. Caring Transitions® works with clients to create a complete move plan, whether it will be used now or later. When the time is right for moving, the client will have decluttered and repaired their home so it may be listed in good condition and they will be fully prepared to move the items that are important to them and sell, donate or gift the rest to friends and family.

 

“If I move to a community, I will lose my independence.”

In reality, a move to a senior community in later life may actually help an individual become more independent, not less. In a retirement setting they have more opportunities to engage in physical, emotional and social activities, all which help keep minds active and sharp.

A true measure of independence is “choice” but when older adults remain at home, they often become dependent on others. Within a community setting, adults have a greater ability to choose how they spend their time.

The ability to make choices for oneself before a medical or mental health crisis can be empowering. By taking the reins and deciding “It’s time for us to downsize!” older adults are better able to make their own decisions about care, finances, home and personal property, rather than leave it to family members. And while some of those tasks may seem daunting at first, professionals like Caring Transitions® are here to help every step of the way.

 

Call Caring Transitions® today for a free consultation.

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